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Photos 4, page 10
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Halema'uma'u Crater
September 7, 2007
I had some errands to run in Hilo (yellow line), then Robin and I met in Kea'au and took a trip up to Kilauea (blue line)
to commune with Madame Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes (we think it's a good idea to stay on her good side).  
We took a little hike out into the caldera, near the
Halema'uma'u Crater...
My new Jeep.  Robin's son, Leber,
moved to Mainland and sold me his car
Robin was interested in these plants
growing out of the volcano...
That's the Jaggar Museum and Hawaii
Volcano Observatory up on the rim
A couple of panoramas of Halema'uma'u Crater made from 5 or 6 sequential shots.  That's
Mauna Loa barely visible in the background
Mauna Kea from Waimea
September 22, 2007
I'd been researching ocean kayaks on the Internet for several months and now that I had a
vehicle on which I could carry one (the Tracker certainly couldn't do the trick), I got serious.  I
finally came across a dealer on the Big Island, "P & P Kayaks" (
www.plentypupule.com).  "P &
P" stands for "Plenty Pupule" which means "plenty crazy" in Hawaiian.  I went over to talk with
the guy, get my questions answered, and be able to actually see and feel the kayaks.  When it
was over, I had purchased kayak which was going to take a couple of days to get ready.  On
the way back (red line) I got a great view of Mauna Kea from the other side...
Get the Kayak
September 24, 2007
Two days later, Robin and I headed over to pick up the kayak.  After we got it, we took it to
Puako Bay (green line) where we tested it out.  After that, we ate lunch at Café Pesto and
headed home (red line).
because the waters around Hawaii are warm enough that one doesn't worry about getting wet and it's much easier
getting in and out.  It's made out of molded plastic and is virtually unsinkable and indestructible.  The first thing I did was
go out and tip it over and practice righting it and getting back in.  Nothing to it.  A kayak like this allows you to just fall
over the side and snorkel if you want, tethering the kayak to your ankle like surfers do with their surf boards so that it
can follow you around while you swim...  It's light enough (50 lb.) so that one person can lift it to the top of the car for
transport.  I'm hoping to go out and visit the whales when they come for winter vacation this year!