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Photos 9, page 17
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Photos 9 -
Photos 9 -
CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE
July 27 Lava Flow ( continued)...
11/01/14-->
11/01/14
A methane explosion in the ground adjacent to
the flow margin threw these blocks of older
lava, some up to half a yard in diameter, a
distance of several yards onto the flow
surface. Just to the left of the geologists is a
crater of disrupted ground, with overturned
blocks of older lava up to a yard in size.
Methane explosions are a hazard in the
immediate vicinity of the flow margin.
11/05/14
The June 27th lava flow remains active above Pahoa. The tip
of the flow remains stalled about 170 yards from
Pahoa
Village Road
, which crosses the photo at very bottom right.
Smoke plumes are visible above town, caused by burning
vegetation at the site of lava breakouts. All breakouts are above
Apa'a Street, except for three small breakouts near Pahoa
cemetery. The largest plume in the top left of the photo is
located several hundred yards above the transfer station. Other
breakouts even further upslope were also producing smoke
plumes, barely visible through the mist.
11/07/14
The June 27th lava flow remains active
above
Pahoa. The tip of the flow remains
stalled about 170 yards from
Pahoa Village
Road, which crosses the middle of the
photo. Smoke plumes are visible above
town, caused by burning vegetation at the
site of lava breakouts. Highway 130 is at
the bottom of this photo, which was taken
from a helicopter.
11/07/14
Another helicopter view of the active June
27th lava flow above
Pahoa. Smoke
plumes are caused by burning vegetation at
the site of lava breakouts along the margins
of the flow.
Apa'a Street / Cemetery
Road
, partially covered by lava, is in the
foreground.
This image shows a comparison of a normal photograph of the flow front with a thermal
image of roughly the same area. The thermal image clearly shows the distribution of active
breakouts (white and yellow spots), some of which were active around the cemetery. The
leading tip of the flow, near
Pahoa Village Road, has stalled and has lower temperatures
(red colors). Farther upslope, breakouts are active near the transfer station and are also
scattered several kilometers upslope of Cemetery Road.
The following pictures are not mine, they are from the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Photo & Video Chronology
webpage, along with the captions in
Times New Roman.  Any comments by me will be in this font.
The active flow lobe advancing along
Cemetery Road / Apa'a Street
approaches a new steel power pole that is
surrounded by a cinder barrier.
Helicopter view of the June 27th flow tip
showing areas of active lava on the morning of
November 10. Smoke from burning
vegetation rises from the north margin of the
flow. Active areas include regions just
downslope and upslope of the transfer station,
and a new lobe of lava, marked by a smoke
plume at the upper right of the photo, is
moving to the northeast approximately 820
yards above
Apa'a Street / Cemetery Road.
Just before noon, HST, on Tuesday,
November 11, 2014, lava pushed through
the fence at the southwest corner of the
Pahoa transfer station and moved down
the slope onto the station grounds. The
flames are caused by burning asphalt.
The flow lobe that destroyed a residence
on Monday has also inflated significantly.
Here, an HVO geologist examines the
margin of that lobe. A barbed wire fence
was surrounded and tilted towards the
camera as the flow inflated, so that the
fence is now nearly horizontal. The red
roof in the background is the garage
structure near the house that burned on
Monday. The garage was still standing as
of noon on Tuesday.
I don't know where I got these photos.  The file dates are 11/11/14 so...
These are pictures of the house that got taken.  I know you would feel cheated if I
didn't show it...
This is one of our state
representatives inspecting the
situation...
11/12/14
Lava continues to advance downslope in several places along the
distal part of the June 27th lava flow, as seen in this photo. The
most active breakout is the flow to the right, which forms a
relatively narrow finger about 390 yards upslope from
Apa'a
Street
. Other breakouts include a tiny lobe that is encroaching on
the solid waste transfer station, the narrow flow that destroyed and
bypassed the house across the street from the transfer station, and
weak activity near the cemetery. The view is looking to the east.
11/12/14
This photo shows the distal part of the
June 27th flow looking toward the
southwest. The stalled tip of the flow is
barely cut off at the left side of the photo.
11/12/14
The small breakout near the solid waste transfer
station began spilling into the truck access road that
loops around the transfer station. This road is quite
a bit lower than the transfer station buildings, and it
will likely take a few days for it to fill up, if the
breakout remains active. The smoke at upper left is
a different breakout, which destroyed the house just
across the street from the transfer station a few
days ago. The view is to the east-northeast.
The house which was recently destroyed by lava is just below
the center of the photo. Lava bypassed the garage, which still
stands at the center of the photo. Lava briefly entered the fish
pond next to the house, before continuing downslope. Also
visible is the small active flow next to the transfer station, and
the larger, more rapidly moving finger about 390 yards
upslope from
Apa'a Street at upper right. The smoke at upper
left marks another breakout widening the flow into the
adjacent forest. The view is to the southwest.
Lava flows continue to encroach on the
Pahoa Japanese Cemetery, with the latest
activity there coming right up to the edge
of the green-roofed shelter. An inflated
ridge '10–13 feet high') cuts across the
cemetery (visible on the near side of the
cemetery in the photo), and is the source
of the recent and active lava visible at the
bottom of the photo.
Another view of the activity near the transfer station, shown by a normal
photograph and a thermal image. The white arrows show corresponding
points of reference. The left arrow marks the tip of this small lobe (one of
many active today), which was approaching
Apa'a St. Small cascades of lava
can be seen flowing down the embankment surrounding the transfer station.
A comparison of a normal photograph with a thermal image of the
leading tip of the June 27th flow. The stalled flow front exhibits lower
surface temperatures (red, purple colors), as it has been stalled for
over a week. Upslope, however, scattered breakouts are active and
have much higher surface temperatures (white, yellow colors).
11/13/14
Terminus of the flow entering the Pahoa
transfer station. Compare to a similar
image taken on November 11. There are no
active toes of lava in the image, but the
lava is still hot enough to burn the asphalt
beneath, creating visible white smoke.
A view looking along the transfer station's
outer fence, which lava burst through
recently. Lava then flowed down the
embankment onto the low access road
(right side of photo).
11/14/14
The June 27th lava flow remains active, with scattered
breakouts upslope of the stalled flow front. The closest active
breakouts to Pahoa Village Road were a short distance north
of the cemetery, and approximately 700 meters (0.4 miles)
upslope of Pahoa Village Road. Most activity, however, was
upslope of Apa?a St./Cemetery Rd. A portion of this activity
was focused along a lobe that was upslope of the transfer
station, about 230 meters (250 yards) upslope of Apa?a St.
This photo shows a close up of the flow around
Cemetery Rd./Apa?a St. In the lower right, the
partially buried cemetery can be seen. Just above
the center of the photo, lava reached the southeast
portion of the transfer station. The house destroyed
earlier this week is across the street from the
transfer station. The broad lobe of lava upslope of
the transfer station was still active today, and
moving through thick vegetation, producing smoke.
Another view of the Apa?a St./Cemetery
Rd. area, looking towards the east. Lava
reached the southeast portion of the
transfer station, but stalled. Two small
breakouts were active near the transfer
station today, but had not expanded the
flow margin significantly. At the top of the
photograph, buildings situated along Pahoa
Village Road can be seen.
This shows a comparison of a normal photograph with a thermal image of the
flow front. The white box shows the approximate extent of the thermal image.
Although the leading tip of the flow stalled on October 30, breakouts remain
active upslope around the cemetery, transfer station, and farther upslope. White
and yellow colors in the thermal image show the areas of active breakouts.
A close up of activity near the transfer station, shown by a normal
photograph and a thermal image. The thermal image shows the extent of
active breakouts much more clearly than the naked eye. For instance, two
small breakouts around the transfer station (marked by two arrows) are
obvious in the thermal image but difficult to see in the normal photograph.
These thermal images compare activity around the flow front on November 5 and 14,
2014. White and yellow colors show areas of active breakouts. On November 5 relatively
few breakouts were active in this portion of the June 27th flow, with a few small breakouts
near the cemetery and one breakout a few hundred meters upslope of the transfer station.
On November 14, however, scattered breakouts were abundant in this area, with new
activity significantly expanding the flow margins around the cemetery and a new lobe
active upslope of the transfer station.
Earlier in the week lava reached the outer
fence of the transfer station, sending several
small cascades through the fence and down
the embankment. Burning of the asphalt
continued for several days. Now that
burning has ceased at the transfer station, a
closer look at these features was possible.
Note that the lava which stalled at the fence
line subsequently inflated to a height slightly
greater than that of the fence.
11/16/14
Inflation along the lava tube has created a long
ridge with a deep, semi-continuous crack
along the ridge centerline (right side of image).
The peak of the ridge, by rough estimate, is
about 4 meters (13 feet) above the original
ground surface. This photo looked northeast
along the trend of the tube, just south of the
cemetery. The short section of uncovered
road is the cemetery access road.
11/24/14
This view looks downslope towards the
east. The active breakout is burning
vegetation along its margins, creating
numerous small smoke plumes. Residential
areas are visible in the upper portion of the
photograph, with Pāhoa in the upper left.