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Photos 9, page 15
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Photos 9 -
Photos 9 -
June 27 Lava Flow
CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE
6/27/14-->
On June 27th, there was a lava breakout on the north side of Pu'u O'o.  No big deal.  Happens all the time.  The light pink
area on the map shows the
Kahauale'a 2 flow, the previous flow, just dying down.  As you can see, my house is directly
north of this activity.  It's 7 miles and cross-slope from
Pu'u O'o so there's no danger of it coming my way.
But by September 4, people were starting to pay attention as the flow got to within 2 miles of the nearest population, Kaohe
Homesteads
, an agricultural area.  The blue lines on the map indicate the mostly likely directions the lava could flow...
By September 17, people were packin' and leavin'!
This is a good view that shows the progress of the flow over time.
View of the flow front, looking north.
Pahoa is located in the upper right portion
of the photograph. The flow front today
was 2.1 miles from
Pahoa Village Road.
stalled over the weekend, but active
breakouts persist near the flow front, a
short distance behind this stalled front.
Today, lava was slowly advancing on a
different front, along the north margin of
the flow. The burn scar from a brush fire
triggered by the lava this weekend covers
much of the lower portion of the
photograph.
Another view of the flow front region,
looking northeast.
Pahoa can be seen near
the top of the photograph, and is about 3.3
km (2.1 miles) from the stalled flow front.
The following pictures are not mine, they are from the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Photo & Video Chronology
webpage, along with the captions.  Any comments by me will be in this font.
9/19/14
9/24/14
9/26/14
Annotated photo showing Puʻu ʻŌʻō and
the vent and upper lava tube for the June
27th lava flow.
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Annotated photo showing the terminus of
the June 27th lava flow. Small, sluggish
breakouts remain active upslope from the
stalled front of the flow, near
Kaohe
Homesteads
. More vigorous breakouts are
active even farther upslope, midway along
the length of the flow and on a pad of lava
within the crack system.
<--
The June 27th lava flow
remains active, with breakouts
a short distance behind the
stalled flow front.
A normal photograph of the front of the June 27th lava flow is
compared here with an equivalent view from a thermal
camera. The thermal image shows the extent of active
breakouts more clearly. These breakouts have been advancing
slowly over the past few days, and were present a short
distance upslope of the stalled flow front.
9/29/14
<--
The June 27th flow remains active. Slow-
moving surface breakouts have reached the
stalled flow front and extended the leading
edge of the flow about 30 yards. The flow
front today was 1.4 miles upslope from
Apaʻa St. and 2.1 miles from Pāhoa
Village Road
.
Another view of the front of the June 27th
lava flow. The thermal image on the right
corresponds to the area of the white box
shown in the normal photograph. The thermal
image shows the distribution of active
breakouts (yellow and white colors) clearly.
10/1/14
<--
The June 27th lava flow remains active, and
the flow front continues to advance towards
the northeast along the forest boundary.
Today, the flow front consisted of a narrow
lobe moving through thick forest. The flow
front was 1.7 km (1.1 miles) upslope of Apaʻa
St., and 2.7 km (1.7 miles) from Pāhoa Village
Road. The lava flow also triggered a brush fire
that was active north of the flow front this
afternoon.
Another view of the flow front and brush
fire, with a thermal image for comparison.
10/6/14
10/6/14
A close-up view of the leading edge of the
June 27th flow, which was active along
the forest boundary. The thermal image
shows the concentration of hot, fluid lava
at the flow margin.
Another view of the flow front, largely
masked by thick smoke, showing the
position of the flow in relation to the Kaohe
Homesteads subdivision (left side of
photograph). The brush fire extends off
the right side of the photo.
Breakouts remain active upslope of the
flow front, in the area that lava first
entered ground cracks. Today these
scattered breakouts were burning forest at
numerous spots along the flow margin.
Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the distance.
10/10/14
October 10, 2014
The June 27th lava flow remains active,
and continues advancing towards the
northeast. The flow front today was still
narrow, about  600 feet wide. The flow
front today was 0.8 miles upslope from
Apa'a St. and 1.5 miles from Pahoa
Village Road
.
Comparison of a normal photograph with a
thermal image. The white box shows the
rough extent of the thermal image. The
thermal image shows active breakouts (white
but also scattered behind the front.
<--
A closer look at the narrow flow front.
Kaohe Homesteads subdivision in the
upper left portion of the image.

-->
A thermal image of the flow front, which
consisted of several lobes moving through
thick vegetation. Yellow and white areas
are active breakouts on the surface, while
the red and purple areas are cooling crust.
October 13, 2014
The flow front remains active, with continued slow advancement
towards the northeast over the weekend. The flow front today was
0.7 miles upslope from
Apa'a St. and 1.4 miles from Pahoa
Village Road
, as measured along a straight line. This photo,
looking down flow and taken at a low altitude, shows the flow front
direction relative to the transfer station and
Pahoa.
October 15, 2014
The June 27th lava flow advancement has slowed, with the leading
edge of the flow moving only a few tens of yards over the past two
days. Nevertheless, active breakouts persist around the flow front,
as shown in this photo by the continued burning of vegetation along
the flow margins. This morning, the flow front was 0.7 miles from
Apa'a St., as measured along a straight line.
10/21/14
<--
Bulldozer nears Park boundary from
Kalapana on the Chain of Craters
Road
extension.  (More on this later...)

-->
The iconic "ROAD CLOSED" sign will
have to go...
The June 27th lava flow remains active, and continues to advance
towards the northeast along the northern boundary of Kaohe
Homesteads subdivision. Over the past day, the leading edge of the
flow has moved ahead as a narrow lobe, and covered part of a dirt
road. The flow front today was 815 meters (0.5 miles) from Apa?a
St., as measured along a straight line.
and the transfer station. The vent for the June 27th lava flow is on
Pu?u ?O?o cone, which can be seen in the upper right portion of
<--
An HVO geologist marks the coordinates
of the flow front with a GPS unit.
-->
HVO geologists walk over the surface of
the flow to track surface breakouts along a
portion of the flow margin, about a
kilometer (0.6 miles) upslope of the flow
front.
This is Tim Orr, the HVO geologist.  We've crossed paths a few times out on the lava.  The GPS unit he's using is identical