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Photos 7, page 25
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3/5 Eruption
March 6-7, 2011
CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE
6 March 2011

Video showing lava pouring from the fissure into a seemingly bottomless crack
Click image for video
Video showing lava pouring from the fissure into a seemingly
bottomless crack.
Nāpau Crater in the background. Helicopter
for scale.
day just west of the base of Pu`u `Ō `ō near the northeastern
end of the fissure system.
Lava spatters above the fissure just west of the base of Pu`u `Ō `ō
Lava spatters above the fissure just west
of the base of
Pu`u `Ō `ō.
Early morning view of the fissure
eruption between
Nāpau Crater and
Pu`u `Ō `ō. View is to the northwest.
Fume from the eruptive vent in
Halema`uma`u can be seen at upper
right against the dark mass of
Mauna
Loa
.
this vent, around which a low cone was
forming.
Pu`u `Ō `ō is visible in the
background to the northeast.
Lava pours from the fissure just after
daybreak and cascades out of sight into
a deep crack. HVO geologist near
upper right for perspective.
A portion of charred, lava covered
forest along the east rift zone, from the
initial fissure eruption that began
yesterday evening (March 5).
A small fissure eruption between Pu`u
`Ō `ō Crater and Nāpau, extending 100
m long (330 ft) and spattering 20 m (66
ft) high.
This fissure is erupting 1.5 km (0.9 mi)
west of
Pu`u `Ō `ō Crater. You can
view this eruption on the new
Pu`u `Ō
to Nāpau Crater webcam installed
today!
A close-up of the fissure just west of
heights of 40 m (130 ft).
Photo taken at dawn of a fissure erupting
between
Pu`u `Ō `ō Crater and Nāpau.
This fissure began in the early hours of
March 6, erupting spatter and producing
lava flows.
Spatter reaching up to 30 m (100 ft)
from a fissure that opened this morning.
Increased activity on one of the new
fissures between
Pu`u `Ō `ō Crater and
More stuff from the HVO update page...
HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Sunday, March 6, 2011 7:30 AM HST (Sunday, March 6, 2011 17:30 UTC)

Activity Summary for past 24 hours: There have been significant changes as
Kilauea volcano continued to erupt at two locations:
On the east rift zone, a fissure eruption that started yesterday afternoon is continuing intermittently at a location approximately 2
km WSW of
Pu`u `O`o. The floor of Pu`u `O`o collapsed yesterday and the Nov. 29 flows were weakly active this morning. At
the summit, the lava lake level receded deep below the rim of the vent inset within the east wall of
Halema`uma`u Crater.
Summit and east rift zone seismicity remained significantly elevated.

Past 24 hours at
Kilauea summit: The lava level receded rapidly through yesterday afternoon and evening but seemed to slow
since midnight; at 7:03 am, a large collapse caused the lava lake level to recede almost beyond view of the webcam. The summit
tiltmeter network recorded continued deflation at a steady rate amounting to almost 28 microradians by this morning. Seismic
tremor levels elevated further between about 2 and 4:30 pm yesterday and then increased to almost ten times background
between 8 pm last night and 4 am this morning.

Approximately one-hundred-and-fifty earthquakes were strong enough to be located within
Kilauea volcano - more than 100
were clustered in the east rift zone, in location, between
Maka`opuhi and Napau Crater and, in time, between 2 pm and
midnight and about 30 were located within the summit area including five estimated to be magnitude-2.5 and above this morning.

The summit gas plume is wispy and moving to the southwest this morning. The most recent (preliminary) sulfur dioxide emission
rate measurement was 400 tonnes/day on March 2, 2011 averaged over at least one high lava stand during which the emissions
may be halved.

Past 24 hours at the middle east rift zone vents: The small fissure eruption that started around 5 pm yesterday had paused by the
time ground crews arrived at 9:55 pm; however, the eruption resumed from approximately the same location by 00:40 am this
morning before stopping a second time at 1:50 am. At 4:22 am this morning, spattering to the height of nearby trees resumed.
Two more fissures opened in the same vicinity at 5:45 am this morning producing more gas than lava. Gas jetting has been
audible for most of these spattering episodes as activity waxes and wanes.

The tiltmeter on the north flank of
Pu`u `O`o recorded over 150 microradians of deflation from 2 pm yesterday; the deflation
rate has markedly slowed by this morning. Seismic tremor levels remain significantly elevated and variable in this part of the rift
zone.

Incandescence within the collapsed
Pu`u `O`o was due to rockfalls. Activity on the Nov. 29 flow was significantly weaker
overnight and may be residual lava left in the tube. Thanks to the Hawai`i County Fire Department for providing a helicopter for
yesterday afternoon's overflight to assess eruption conditions. HVO crews will do another overflight this morning.
HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY CURRENT STATUS REPORT
Sunday, March 6, 2011 6:34 PM HST (Monday, March 7, 2011 04:34 UTC)

KILAUEA VOLCANO (CAVW #1302-01-)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: RED

A fissure that opened on Kilauea's east rift zone after yesterday's collapse of the Pu'u 'O'o crater floor continues to erupt lava.
Activity along the fissure was sporadic overnight and throughout today, with periods of quiet punctuated by episodes of lava
spattering up to 25 m (80 ft) high.

The fissure is located west-southwest of Pu'u 'O'o in a remote area of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Due to the ongoing
volcanic activity, Park closures remain in effect in this area.

Live views of Kilauea's fissure eruption are now possible via a Webcam installed by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
(HVO) this afternoon. The Webcam images, which are updated every five minutes, can be accessed at
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/cams/NCcam/.

Measurements made by HVO scientists today show that the Pu'u 'O'o crater floor dropped at least 115 m (377 ft) during
Saturday's collapse. The only signs of activity within the crater today were infrequent cascades of rock fragments falling from
collapse blocks. This activity is visible when Pu'u 'O'o Webcam views, accessible at
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/cams/POcam/, are not obscured by volcanic fume.

Lava flows on the pali and coastal plain are still active, but sluggish. Whether these flows are residual lava draining through the
tube system or outbreaks that continue to be fed by lava from the east rift zone vent is not yet known. Based on similar events in
past years, it will take a day or two to see if the lava supply has been cut off by the uprift fissure eruption.

At Kilauea's summit, the lava lake has receded deep within the vent in Halema'uma'u Crater and is now barely visible in HVO's
Webcam images (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/cams/HMcam/). Small collapses of the vent walls occasionally produce
dusty-brown plumes that can be seen from Park visitor overlooks.

Earthquakes are occurring at lower rates in the Napau Crater area adjacent to the new fissure eruption and beneath the summit
caldera, but seismic tremor is significantly elevated in both areas. Summit deflation continues, but began to slow this afternoon.
Deflation of the Pu'u 'O'o area has slowed throughout the day.

Daily updates about Kilauea's ongoing eruptions, recent images and videos of summit and east rift zone volcanic activity, and
data about recent earthquakes are posted on the HVO Web site at
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov. Additional status reports will be
posted as warranted.
HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Monday, March 7, 2011 8:59 AM HST (Monday, March 7, 2011 18:59 UTC)

Activity Summary for past 24 hours: There have been significant changes as Kilauea volcano continued to erupt at two locations:
On the east rift zone, a fissure eruption that started Saturday afternoon continued intermittently at locations approximately 2-3.5
km WSW of Pu`u `O`o. Pu`u `O`o Crater and the TEB/Nov. 29 flows were inactive this morning. At the summit, the lava lake
level remained deep below the rim of the vent inset within the east wall of Halema`uma`u Crater. Summit and east rift zone
seismicity remained significantly elevated.

Past 24 hours at Kilauea summit: The lava level remained very deep within the vent inset within the east wall of Halema`uma`u
Crater. The summit tiltmeter network recorded slowing deflation. Seismic tremor levels remained significantly elevated.

Eighteen earthquakes were strong enough to be located within Kilauea volcano - 10 were clustered in the east rift zone near the
fissure eruption, five were beneath the summit area, and three were on south flank faults.

The summit gas plume is moving to the southwest this morning. The most recent (preliminary) sulfur dioxide emission rate
measurement was 600 tonnes/day on March 6, 2011.

Past 24 hours at the middle east rift zone vents: The fissure eruption that started Saturday afternoon continued through this
morning with vigorous spattering from the west end of the fissure which is just east of Napau Crater and about 2-3.5 km WSW
of Pu`u `O`o. The most recent (preliminary) sulfur dioxide emission rate measurement was 7,000 tonnes/day on March 6, 2011
from all east rift zone sources.

The tiltmeter on the north flank of Pu`u `O`o recorded slowing deflation. Seismic tremor levels remain significantly elevated and
variable in this part of the rift zone.

There was visible incandescence deep within a hornito over Fissure D (the TEB vent) but no other visible activity within the
collapsed Pu`u `O`o Crater nor on the TEB/Nov. 29 flow field.
7 March 2011

Video showing low fountaining from the dominant vent, adjacent to Nāpau Crater
Video showing low fountaining from the dominant vent, near the southwest
on March 7.
Video showing the collapse of the Pu`u `Ō `ō crater floor on March 5
Video showing the collapse of the Pu`u `Ō `ō crater floor on March 5.
The video starts at 4 am and ends at 11 pm. The floor of the crater
dropped about 115 meters (377 ft) in just a few hours.