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Photos 7, page 23
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Volcano Happenings
January 13 to February 4, 2011
CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE
So this is where we left it on January 13th, 2011
We'll pick up the narrative with excerpts from the
Kilauea Update Page.
HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Tuesday, January 18, 2011 8:50 AM HST (Tuesday, January 18, 2011 18:50 UTC)
Activity Summary for past 24 hours:
Kilauea volcano continued to erupt at two locations:
On the east rift zone, lava flows resumed within
Pu`u `O`o crater at 6 am this morning and were visible via webcam. The
branched Nov. 29 flow extended from the 1,200 ft elevation to the coast and continued to host scattered breakouts; the western
branch may have stalled while the eastern branch continued inflation,
destroying one structure overnight (my underline), and
continued slow southward expansion toward the coast in
Kalapana.
At the summit, lava deep within an eruptive vent inset within the east wall of
Halema`uma`u Crater was significantly disrupted
by numerous rockfalls between 6 pm yesterday and 3 am this morning. The lava lake continued to circulate with much more
vigorous degassing over its surface; glow was visible overnight from the Jaggar Museum. Sulfur dioxide emission rates from the
summit and east rift zone vents remained elevated.

The November 29 flow (1,200 ft elevation tube breach) was still active in two main branches, each branch continued to host
scattered breakouts. The western branch may have stalled. In
Kalapana, the lowest active lobes of the eastern branch were
inflating and slowly advancing southward through a kipuka, in which lava-induced fires sometimes burned and methane blasts
were possible, and was about 100 m (330 ft) from the coast this morning; Civil Defense reported yesterday that
lava had
reached a third structure near highway 130 in the Kalapana area and it was reported destroyed by this morning
(my underline).

HAZARD ALERT: The lava deltas and adjacent areas both inland and out to sea are some of the most hazardous areas on
the flow field. Delta/bench collapses give little warning, can produce hot rock falls inland and in the adjacent coastal waters,
and can produce large local waves. The steam plume produced by lava entering the ocean contains fine lava fragments,
toxic gases, and an assortment of acid droplets that can be harmful to your health. The rapidly changing conditions near
the ocean entry have been responsible for many injuries and a few deaths.

Kalapana Public Access Information from Hawai`i County Civil Defense: Kalapana Gardens is a private subdivision and
access will only be granted to subdivision residents. Private property borders highway 130 through Kalapana, and visitors
to the Hawai`i County Lava Viewing Area are not allowed access off the highway easement. Hawai`i County Police will be
monitoring the area. Hawai`i County Lava Viewing Area status can be found by calling 961-8093.

Definitions of Terms Used:

DI tilt event: DI is an abbreviation for 'deflation-inflation' and describes a volcanic event of uncertain significance. DI events are
recorded by tiltmeters at
Kilauea summit as an abrupt deflation of up to a few microradians in magnitude lasting several hours to
2-3 days followed by an abrupt inflation of approximately equal magnitude. The tilt events are usually accompanied by an
increase in summit tremor during the deflation phase. A careful analysis of these events suggests that they may be related to
changes in magma supply to a storage reservoir at less than 1 km depth, just east of Halema`uma`u crater. Usually, though not
always, these changes propagate through the magma conduit from the summit to the east rift eruption site, as many of the DI
events at Kilauea summit are also recorded at a tiltmeter at
Pu`u `O`o, delayed by several hours. DI events often correlate with
lava pulses and/or pauses in the eruption at the Pu`u `O`o/July 21/TEB vents.
(Understand?  There will be a quiz at the end of the page so pay attention!)

Inflating surface flow: is a lava flow that may not advance but continues to thicken as its top and bottom crusts grow around a
continuously replenished molten interior. This can be visualized as a large flat bladder of molten lava that could burst along its
edges at any time.

kipuka: An island of vegetation surrounded by lava.

makai, mauka: Hawaiian terms for directions relative to the coast - makai (toward the coast) and mauka (away from the coast).

methane blast: when lava flows advance through a vegetated area, small explosions sometimes occur due to the ignition of
methane gas, produced by lava-cooked plants and trapped beneath the ground surface. Injuries can occur as the result of
airborne rock fragments.
Wednesday, January 19, 2011 8:44 AM HST (Wednesday, January 19, 2011 18:44 UTC)
The November 29 flow (1,200 ft elevation tube breach) was still active in two main branches, each branch continued to host
scattered breakouts. The western branch may have stalled - it is no longer feeding lava into the ocean. In
Kalapana, the lowest
active lobes of the eastern branch were inflating and slowly advancing eastward and southward through a
kipuka, in which
Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:22 AM HST (Thursday, January 20, 2011 18:22 UTC)
The western branch is no longer feeding lava into the ocean and may have stalled on the coastal plain. In
Kalapana, ...no
structures are imminently threatened and a temporary slowdown in local activity might be anticipated due to the ongoing DI event.

Friday, January 21, 2011 8:02 AM HST (Friday, January 21, 2011 18:02 UTC)
In
Kalapana, the end of the eastern branch continued to inflate and was split into a lobe advancing eastward and a lobe
advancing southward through a
kipuka... toward the coast. On yesterday's overflight, HVO geologists noted that this southern
lobe was meters away from the ocean around noon; although there were a few disparate observations of steam from the
coastline in this vicinity yesterday and this morning, it is still uncertain whether an ocean entry has developed. No structures are
imminently threatened and a temporary slowdown in local activity might be anticipated due to the ongoing DI event.

Saturday, January 22, 2011 7:30 AM HST (Saturday, January 22, 2011 17:30 UTC)
In
Kalapana, the end of the eastern branch continued to inflate and was split into a lobe advancing east- and southward along
the edge of 2010 flows and a lobe advancing southward through a kipuka, in which lava-induced fires sometimes burned and
methane blasts were possible, on the coast. Residents reported briefly seeing steam from the new entry but it was not sustained
and there is no steam evident this morning. No structures appear to be imminently threatened.

Sunday, January 23, 2011 9:52 AM HST (Sunday, January 23, 2011 19:52 UTC)
Activity levels seemed lower overnight along with deflation at
Pu`u `O`o. Sporadic, weak plumes where lava from the eastern
lobe was last seen near the ocean suggested that no continuous ocean entry has been established. No structures appear to be
imminently threatened.

Monday, January 24, 2011 7:55 AM HST (Monday, January 24, 2011 17:55 UTC)
Activity levels seemed to increase overnight with many active breakouts on the flow field. Sporadic, weak plumes where lava
from the eastern lobe was last seen near the ocean suggested that no continuous ocean entry has been established. No structures
appear to be imminently threatened.

Tuesday, January 25, 2011 7:58 AM HST (Tuesday, January 25, 2011 17:58 UTC)
In
Kalapana, the end of the eastern branch continued to inflate and was split into a lobe advancing along the edge of 2010 flows
makai of highway 130 and a lobe advancing southward through a kipuka, in which lava-induced fires sometimes burned and
methane blasts were possible, to the coast where a small ocean entry was established.

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 7:14 AM HST (Wednesday, January 26, 2011 17:14 UTC)
...to the coast where two small ocean entries were active on the western part of the
Puhi-o-Kalaikini lava delta.

Thursday, January 27, 2011 6:49 AM HST (Thursday, January 27, 2011 16:49 UTC)
In
Kalapana, the end of the eastern branch continued to inflate in several places and was split into a lobe advancing along the
edge of 2010 flows on both sides of highway 130... to the coast where multiple small ocean entries were active on the western
part of the
Puhi-o-Kalaikini lava delta.

Monday, January 31, 2011 6:36 AM HST (Monday, January 31, 2011 16:36 UTC)
...The ongoing DI event may produce a temporary reduction in lava flow activity in
Kalapana.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011 7:55 AM HST (Tuesday, February 1, 2011 17:55 UTC)
In
Kalapana, the end of the eastern branch continued to inflate in several places and was split into an inflating lobe, with several
new breakouts, along the edge of 2010 flows... The ongoing DI inflation may produce a temporary increase in lava flow activity
in
Kalapana.

Wednesday, February 2, 2011 7:39 AM HST (Wednesday, February 2, 2011 17:39 UTC)
The November 29 flow (1,200 ft elevation tube breach) was still active in two main branches, each branch continued to host
scattered breakouts; another breakout, possibly from the same lava tube that feeds the November 29 flow, started over the top
of the
pali early this morning...

Thursday, February 3, 2011 7:56 AM HST (Thursday, February 3, 2011 17:56 UTC)
...another breakout, possibly from the same lava tube that feeds the November 29 flow, continued at the top of the
pali.

Friday, February 4, 2011 7:17 AM HST (Friday, February 4, 2011 17:17 UTC)
The November 29 flow (1,200 ft elevation tube breach) was still active in two main branches, each branch continued to host
scattered breakouts. In
Kalapana, the eastern branch continued to inflate in several places and was split into an east lobe over
highway 130 and a south lobe that extends through a
kipuka, in which lava-induced fires and methane blasts were possible, to
the coast where small ocean entries may be active on the western part of the
Puhi-o-Kalaikini lava delta.
I've been a bad boy and haven't kept you up to date on what's happening at the Kilauea Caldera, almost right next door
to where I live - about 5 miles as the
Nene flies.  Mainly because there's no lava visible.  But there's been an awful lot of
activity going on up there.  But I can't get at it!
Here's a
link to a page that will remedy that situation.  There's a lot of really cool stuff there!

Below is an example of what you can see:  a look down into
Halema'uma'u Crater at the lava pond below.
The lava pond in the vent cavity of the Halema`uma`u Overlook vent during the rise phase of a
rise/fall cycle. In this photo, the lava pond is 95 m (312 ft) below the floor of Halema`uma`u crater.
When the pond level is high there is very little fume, allowing for unusually clear views.
8 February 2011
A look into Halema`uma`u Overlook vent shows the depth of the lava pond